1). WELCOME HOME

We're so excited you stopped by. Make yourself at home, click around, and spend some time getting to know us! The most common question we get is: "What is Orthodox Christianity?" That's a huge question, so we'll save you some time and give you the express version!

2). ORTHODOXY IS

Evangelical, but not Protestant. Orthodox, but not Jewish. Catholic, but not Roman. Pre-denominational. Has been believed, taught, preserved, defended, and died for. It is the Faith that has established the Universe. Proclaiming the Truth since 33 A.D.

3). OUR HOPE FOR YOU

Our hope and prayer is for you to come and encounter Christ in a real way through our worship; a wholesome worship that elevates us to heaven. Take the leap - Come and See! We, and most especially Christ, is ready to meet you and welcome you with open arms!

Making the Most Out of Lent

Above is an EXCELLENT presentation by Father David Mastroberte of Saint John the Baptist (ACROD) in Hermitage, PA about Great Lent. We hope you find this presentation spiritually edifying and intellectually rewarding!

LENTEN RETREAT AT SAINT MARK ORTHODOX CHURCH

MARCH 3-5, 2023

 

All are invited to attend the 2023 Lenten retreat at Saint Mark Orthodox Church (Liberty, OH) led by Father John Parker, Dean of Saint Tikhons Seminary. 

FATHER JOHN WILL SPEAK ON "LIVING THE GOSPEL."

Accompanying Father John will be the Miracle working icon of Saint Anna, the grandmother of our Lord.

 

WEEKEND SCHEDULE:

FRIDAY

5:00 PM - Greet the Icon of St Anna & Akathist; Dinner to Follow & First Session

 

SATURDAY

9:00 AM - Divine Liturgy, followed by a light breakfast & Second Session

12:00 PM - Lunch

1:30 PM - Third Session followed by Great Vespers

 

SUNDAY

9:00 AM - Orthros

10:00 AM - Divine Liturgy

 

TICKETS ARE $10 (Tickets are sold at the door!)

 

For more info or to make your reservation please email Father Colin Barker: frcolinb@gmail.com

Great Lent: A Time of Preparation

The Great Fast or Lent is the period of preparation leading up to Holy Week and Pascha. The Lenten Triodion governs the divine services of Great Lent as well as those of the Weeks of Preparation preceding Great Lent. Lent is a Middle English word meaning "spring." The Great Fast has come to be called Lent by association; it is called "great" to distinguish it from the other fasts.

Observance of Great Lent is characterized by abstention from many foods, intensified private and public prayer, personal improvement, and almsgiving. The foods traditionally abstained from are meat and dairy products, fish, wine and oil. (According to some traditions, only olive oil is abstained from; in others, all vegetable oils.) Since strict fasting is canonically forbidden on the Sabbath and the Lord's Day, wine and oil are permitted on Saturdays and Sundays. If the Feast of the Annunciation falls during Great Lent, then fish, wine and oil are permitted on that day.

Besides the additional liturgical celebrations described below, Orthodox Christians are expected to pay closer attention to their private prayers and to say more of them more often. The Fathers have referred to fasting without prayer as "the fast of the demons" since the demons do not eat according to their incorporeal nature, but neither do they pray.

During the weekdays of Great Lent, there is a liturgical fast when the eucharistic Divine Liturgy is not celebrated. However, since it is considered especially important to receive the Holy Mysteries during this season the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts, also called the Liturgy of St. Gregory the Dialogist, may be celebrated on Wednesdays and Fridays. At this vesperal service some of the Body and Blood of Christ reserved the previous Sunday is distributed. On Saturday and Sunday the Divine Liturgy may be celebrated as usual, although on Sundays the more solemn Liturgy of St. Basil the Great is used in place of that of St. John Chrysostom.

Like the observation of Lent in the West, Great Lent itself lasts for forty days, but unlike the West, Sundays are included in the count. It officially begins on Monday seven weeks before Pascha and concludes on the eve of Lazarus Saturday, the day before Palm Sunday. However, fasting continues for the following week, known as Passion Week, Great Week or Holy Week, up until Pascha.

The original purpose of the pre-Pascha fast (now known as Great Lent) was the fasting of catechumens who were being prepared for baptism and entry into the Church. However, it quickly became a time for those who were already Christian to prepare for the feast of the Resurrection of Christ. It is the living symbol of man's entire life which is to be fulfilled in his own resurrection from the dead with Christ. It is a time of renewed devotion: of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. It is a time of repentance, a real renewal of minds, hearts and deeds in conformity with Christ and his teachings. It is the time, most of all, of return to the great commandments of loving God and neighbors.

 

QUICKLINKS & RESOURCES

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New Here?
New Here? No problem! Our home is your home. Click below to learn a little about who we are, what we stand for, and why you belong.
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Daily Readings
Here you'll find daily scripture readings, the lives of the saints, and much more.
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Schedule
From worship, to bible study, to special events and festivals. This is where you'll find everything you need to know about what's going on, and when.
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Prayer Corner
Click here to view our up to date prayer lists. You may also submit names for our clergy and parish community to pray for.
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Media & Bulletins
Can't make it to Church? Click below to access our Sunday bulletin, watch our streamed services, and listen to Father Brian & Fr Jonathan's archived sermons.
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Upcoming Events
Click here to view our upcoming events sponsored by Saint John's Bookstore & Gift Shop.
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Youth & Teen
Find out what's happening with our youth group, when they meet and how you can get involved.
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Bookstore
Saint John's Bookstore & Gift Shop features a wide variety of handmade religious goods from all over the world, an incredible collection of Christian books, home goods, and more.
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The Divine Liturgy Educational Series (Season 2)

Join us for Season 2 of Fr Brian's class on the Divine Liturgy, in our social hall at 6:30pm. Come and learn how the Divine Liturgy came to be; its origin, history and development over the centuries. This class is open to everyone - so don't be shy! We can't wait to see you!


Classes Resume NOVEMBER 2

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Alcoholics Anonymous

Saint John's Orthodox Church is proud to host Silent Hope every Wednesday evening at 5:00pm for Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. This meeting will be a weekly rotating format with a lead at the end of each month. There will be coffee, snacks and a 50/50 raffle each week. Come and join us for some fellowship and recovery! Contacts: Angela C. (330) 314-3805 and Crystal J. (330) 442-8361. We look forward to seeing you!


Open to ALL!

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Iconography Class

Having completed the Iconography class, the series is now posted on our YouTube page! We thank Father Brian for sharing his knowledge and wisdom about holy icons. Click below to watch the videos and learn what icons mean, why they exist, what they're used for, and the development of iconography over the centuries. In these classes, Father Brian will teach you how to interpret icons through a biblical and historical lens. CLICK HERE to view the archived playlist! Enjoy!


Archived

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q. Does a person have to be Greek, or Russian, or from some other European heritage to be an Orthodox Christian?
A. Most emphatically NO! The various Orthodox churches in the United States welcome anyone for worship and to consider membership. At the present time, the Orthodox churches in the West are experiencing significant growth from Protestants and Roman Catholics interested in our worship and doctrines. The Orthodox Church is Christ’s Church and is therefore open to everyone.

Q. What is the language used during Sunday worship?
A. All of our services will be 100% in English, with the exception of a few services where a common hymn might be sung in many languages (Russian,  Greek, Romanian, Arabic). These specific hymns are festal and account for .05% less English than usual. 

Q. Is your Church family friendly?
A. Yes! Absolutely! In our Church families worship together in the same space. We are used to hearing the rustle and bustle of our little ones. However, if our little ones get out of hand (as they sometimes do) we ask that you please step out with your child until. him or her calms down, and as not. to distract fellow worshippers. 

Q. Can I receive Holy Communion?
A. Sadly, no, as the Christian Church is tragically divided and does not yet share the same One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Faith in Christ. Receiving Holy Communion is the paramount sign of the Oneness of the Faith, which is not a reality at present. Please pray for the unity of all Christians in both faith and love. We encourage our non-Orthodox visitors to get in the communion line in order to receive a blessing from the priest, and to partake of our post-communion bread and wine, known as "Antidoron," which means, "Instead of the gift." The gift being, the Eucharist.

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DID YOU KNOW?!

  • There are some 250 million Orthodox Christians in the world.
  • Most Christians in Greece, Romania, Bulgaria and Serbia, Russia and Ukraine are Orthodox.
  • Three million Americans are Orthodox Christians
  • The heaviest concentrations of Orthodox in America are in Alaska, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio.
  • Our specific parish is a community of the Diocese of the Midwest, in the Orthodox Church in America.
    • Our diocesan bishop is The Right Reverend Daniel; the OCA Primate is Metropolitan Tikhon.
  • Organized Orthodox Church life first came to America in 1794 with missionaries from old Russia who came to Alaska.
  • Centuries of vigorous Orthodox missionary activity across 12 times zones in northern Europe and Asia was halted by the Communists after the Soviet Revolution in 1917.
  • Orthodox missions are active in Central Africa, Japan Korea and many other parts of the world.

 

Orthodox Church in America

The Mission of the Orthodox Church in America, the local autocephalous Orthodox Church, is to be faithful in fulfilling the commandment of Christ to “Go into all the world and make disciples of all Nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching the...

Diocese of the Midwest

The Diocese of the Midwest is administered from the Diocesan Center located in Chicago, Illinois. We are a diocese of the Orthodox Church in America under the Omophorion of His Grace, the Right Reverend Daniel. Here you'll find more information about our more immediate leadership, structure and dioc...

Assembly of Bishops in the USA

The Assembly of Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the United States of America is made up of all the active, canonical Orthodox bishops in the United States of America, of every jurisdiction....

Orthodox Christian Fellowship

OCF transforms the lives of college students by guiding them along the path to Jesus Christ through His Church, cultivating a campus community of worship, witness, service, fellowship, and education....

OUR ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

Click below to visit the websites of our sister Orthodox Christian Churches in Warren, Ohio. We've also included links to our beloved Orthodox Monasteries, located in Ellwood City, PA and Hiram, OH.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, please contact the parish/monastery administrators to inquire about visiting. 







CONNECT WITH US
 

Address: 2220 Reeves Road • Warren, OH 44483     Phone: (330) 372-3895     Email: FrBrian@stjohnswarren.com